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Port Charlotte Distracted Driving Accident Attorney

Distracted driving has become commonplace on America’s roadways, and while it may seem innocent to those who are doing it, it is putting lives at risk every day. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), distracted driving is defined as any activity that diverts attention away from driving and it is the leading cause of death for 2,841 people in the country in 2018. This does not include all of the other fatalities where distracted driving played a role in the crash where the victims survived with life-altering injuries. If you were injured in a traffic collision of any type, chances are there was distracted driving involved.  It is time to hold the at-fault party responsible by hiring a trustworthy Port Charlotte distracted driving accident attorney from Hale Law, P.A. to work on your case.

Types of Distracted Driving

EndDistractedDriving.org lists the three classifications for distracted driving depending on how the driver is impaired.

  • Manual – any distraction that causes a driver to move their hands away from the wheel;
  • Visual – any distraction that causes a driver to take their eyes off of the road; and
  • Cognitive – any distraction that causes a driver’s mind to wander off the task of driving.

Some distractions cause multiple types of impairments for a driver. For instance, texting causes manual, visual, and cognitive impairments, which makes it particularly hazardous. Similarly, reaching for a snack in the backseat means a driver is moving their hands away from the wheel and potentially their eyes away from the road. Likely, they are also cognitively distracted by focusing on the snack instead of the car in front of them.

More Examples of Distracted Driving

  • Using a phone for social media posts, email, photos, or even the map feature;
  • Talking to passengers;
  • Looking at billboards or signs instead of the road;
  • Adjusting the dials on the radio;
  • Talking on the phone;
  • Applying make-up or doing hair;
  • Eating or drinking;
  • Making seat position adjustments;
  • Driving while otherwise emotionally distressed;
  • Searching for something that dropped by your feet or in the backseat; and
  • More.

Ways to Prove Distracted Driving

Often a driver who causes a crash will try to avoid blame. This means they may not readily admit to having been on the phone or in an argument with a passenger when the crash occurred. In this case, it is crucial to investigate the crash scene thoroughly. This includes looking for details like a make-up case open on the passenger’s seat in crash photos or a witness statement of another driver who saw the car drifting in the lane prior to the collision. A qualified attorney can help with making sure all the details of the crash are properly presenting during an insurance claim.

Contact our Port Charlotte Distracted Driving Accident Attorneys Today

You were already the victim of a distracted driver, but you should not be responsible for covering medical bills and property damage costs on top of the emotional distress of being in a traffic collision. A Port Charlotte distracted driving personal injury attorney at Hale Law, P.A. can help you recuperate costs through the legal system. To schedule a free consultation with one of our Port Charlotte attorneys, call 941-735-4529 today.

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